Halloween Roar: You Can’t Miss These Adorable Photos of the Forest Heroes Tiger Costume Parties

On Saturday, Forest Heroes partied down in Ann Arbor Battle Creek, Grand Rapids, and Lansing, welcoming area families to some Tiger Costume Parties, where kids could get their faces painted, dress up in tiger costumes, and play some games while learning about the Sumatran tiger, which is being pushed to the brink of extinction by palm oil-driven deforestation.

“I was shocked to learn that the Halloween candy I had been giving away over the years was leading to deforestation and tiger extinction on the other side of the world,” said Sarah Low, Battle Creek resident and parent of 2 year old Ruby. “I can stomach scary movies and costumes but not treats from deforestation. Thankfully, I learned today that there are many tiger-friendly options to choose from!”

You can read more about the parties in this earlier post, or scroll all the way to the bottom for a lot more details. And here’s some local media coverage of the parties from: The Battle Creek EnquirerThe Rapidan in Grand Rapids, the WMEAC blog, and WMUK public radio.

Finally,  be sure to check out the Forest Heroes Tiger-Friendly Halloween candy purchasing guide.

In Ann Arbor:

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More photos from Battle Creek, Grand Rapids, and Lansing.

In Battle Creek


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In Grand Rapids:

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HALLOWEEN ROAR

Michigan Families Hold “Tiger Costume Party,”
Urge Kellogg’s to be a Forest Hero

This weekend, just days before Halloween, Michigan families and the Forest Heroes Campaign came together for a Tiger Costume Party, urging Kellogg’s to stop rainforest destruction and save the Sumatran tiger..

As dozens of kids played tiger games and dressed up in tiger ears, tails and costumes, their parents called on Kellogg’s CEO John Bryant to end its joint venture with Asian agribusiness giant Wilmar International. Wilmar is a key player in the palm oil industry, which is driving the Sumatran tiger to the edge of extinction. Newsweek twice named Wilmar the least sustainable major company in the world.

“Kellogg’s is a great Michigan institution, but they should know better than to partner with a company that is destroying precious Sumatran tiger habitat in the hunt for palm oil,” said Jez Vedua, a Battle Creek resident. “Kellogg’s is putting its reputation and legacy at risk. What would Tony say?”

Families at the event also learned about how to have a Tiger Friendly Halloween – by not giving out candy made with deforestation-based palm oil. Lollipops, hard candy, and gummies are always fine, but many chocolate Halloween candies and Halloween-themed treats like doughnuts do include palm oil from deforestation. Among major brands, there is one exception: Nestlé, which has committed to zero deforestation. For all other brands, parents are urged to check the ingredients.

“I was shocked to learn that the Halloween candy I had been giving away over the years was leading to deforestation and tiger extinction on the other side of the world,” said Sarah Low, Battle Creek resident and parent of 2 year old Ruby.  “I can stomach scary movies and costumes but not treats from deforestation. Thankfully, I learned today that there are many tiger-friendly options to choose from!”

As Nestlé shows, palm oil – a product used in 50% of consumer goods from snacks to soaps and detergents – can be grown without destroying our rainforests. But when rainforests and carbon rich peat lands are clear-cut, immense amounts of carbon are released into the atmosphere. Due to widespread deforestation, Indonesia has become the third largest contributor to global warming pollution, behind only the U.S. and China.

On October 31, 2013
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