Michiganders to Kellogg: Your Turn to be a Forest Hero

Today, a dozen local residents converged on Kellogg headquarters in Battle Creek, Michigan, demanding that the company fulfill its potential as a true Forest Hero. Advocates delivered a picture-a-day 2014 calendar to Kellogg’s Battle Creek headquarters containing 365 photo petitions from concerned citizens — roughly one for each of the less than 400 Sumatran tigers left in the world. The group asked Kellogg to become a Forest Hero in 2014 by adopting a global responsible palm oil purchasing policy this year that requires all palm oil used by the company to be deforestation-free and exploitation-free. The group also delivered over 13,700 personal messages to Kellogg’s CEO John Bryant from consumers across the globe, collected by global consumer watchdog SumOfUs.org.

3777In December we shared the incredible news that palm oil giant Wilmar — a major joint venture partner of Kellogg’s — announced a new “No Deforestation, No Peat, No Exploitation Policy.” The policy would, if implemented, catalyze a wholesale change in how palm oil is produced, and where plantations are sited. This was a major victory for the Forest Heroes campaign, which after months of campaigning, successfully compelled Kellogg’s CEO John Bryant and other Kellogg executives and staff to urge Wilmar to adopt the policy.

Yet Kellogg’s own palm oil policy is still inadequate. As surreal as it is to say this, now its time for Kellogg to follow Wilmar’s lead.

3758

“If Tony the Tiger has taught us anything, it’s that ‘pretty good’ isn’t good enough,” said said Joyce Jackson, Battle Creek resident and volunteer with the Forest Heroes Campaign. “Kellogg’s should resolve to be a grrrrrrrreeeat Forest Hero. It helped change its business partner Wilmar’s destructive practices, but now Kellogg’s has to get its own house in order.”

Here’s a slideshow of the many of the 365 photo petitions, and the press release and more photos from the delivery are below.  

THE COUNTDOWN BEGINS

Michiganders to Kellogg’s:In 2014, Resolve to Become a Forest Hero

Battle Creek, MI – After using its influence to impact a company on the other side of the world, Kellogg’s now faces a new test: making sure its cereal and other products aren’t made from palm oil grown by destroying Sumatran tiger habitat. That’s the challenge raised by Michigan advocates today, who called on the iconic company to become a forest hero in 2014.

Advocates delivered a picture-a-day calendar to Kellogg’s Battle Creek headquarters containing 365 photo petitions from concerned citizens – about one for each of the less than 400 Sumatran tigers left in the world.  (Photos are available online at www.ForestHeroes.org.) The group also delivered over 13,700 personal messages to Kellogg’s CEO John Bryant from consumers across the globe, collected by global consumer watchdog SumOfUs.org.

“If Tony the Tiger has taught us anything, it’s that ‘pretty good’ isn’t good enough,” said Joyce Jackson, Battle Creek resident and volunteer with the Forest Heroes Campaign. “Kellogg’s should resolve to be a grrrrrrrreeeat Forest Hero. It helped change its business partner Wilmar’s destructive practices, but now Kellogg’s has to get its own house in order.”

Last December, Michiganders made their power felt halfway around the world when Asian agribusiness giant Wilmar International announced tough new sustainability practices – following a call from its business partner Kellogg’s. 

“Thanks in part to Kellogg’s influence with Wilmar, we know there will likely be a ready supply of responsible palm oil that isn’t made by destroying rainforests or exploiting local communities,” said Rich Heeres, parent of three and retired educator who grew up eating Kellogg’s Cornflakes. “That’s what Wilmar’s policy change is all about. There is nothing stopping Kellogg’s from adopting a similar global responsible palm oil policy this year to stop buying palm oil that is destroying habitat and killing Sumatran tigers, orangutans, and other endangered species. What would Tony say?”

Palm oil is a $50 billion a year commodity that makes its way into half of all consumer goods on the shelves. It is in chocolate, baked goods, soaps, detergents, and much more. U.S. imports have increased almost fivefold over the past ten years, and Kellogg’s is a major buyer.

3773
3756 3761 3771

On January 29, 2014
By

Comments are closed.

« »